Investigation of energetic particle release using multi-point imaging and in situ observations

Bei Zhu, Ying D. Liu, Ryun-Young Kwon, Rui Wang

The solar eruption on 2012 January 27 resulted in a wide-spread solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed by STEREO A and the near-Earth spacecraft (separated by 108\degree). The event was accompanied by an X-class flare, extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave and fast coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate the particle release by comparing the release times of particles at the spacecraft and the times when magnetic connectivity between the source and the spacecraft was established. The EUV wave propagating to the magnetic footpoint of the spacecraft in the lower corona and the shock expanding to the open field line connecting the spacecraft in the upper corona are thought to be responsible for the particle release. We track the evolution of the EUV wave and model the propagation of the shock using EUV and white-light observations. No obvious evidence indicates that the EUV wave reached the magnetic footpoint of either STEREO A or L1-observers. Our shock modeling shows that the release time of the particles observed at L1 was consistent with the time when the shock first established contact with the magnetic field line connecting L1-observers. The release of the particles observed by STEREO A was delayed relative to the time when the shock was initially connected to STEREO A via the magnetic field line. We suggest that the particle acceleration efficiency of the portion of the shock connected to the spacecraft determines the release of energetic particles at the spacecraft.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.04934

Densities Probed by Coronal Type III Radio Burst Imaging

Patrick I. McCauley, Iver H. Cairns, John Morgan

We present coronal density profiles derived from low-frequency (80-240 MHz) imaging of three type III solar radio bursts observed at the limb by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Each event is associated with a white light streamer at larger heights and is plausibly associated with thin extreme ultraviolet rays at lower heights. Assuming harmonic plasma emission, we find average electron densities of 1.8 x10^8 cm^-3 down to 0.20 x10^8 cm^-3 at heights of 1.3 to 1.9 solar radii. These values represent roughly 2.4-5.4x enhancements over canonical background levels and are comparable to the highest streamer densities obtained from data at other wavelengths. Assuming fundamental emission instead would increase the densities by a factor of 4. High densities inferred from type III source heights can be explained by assuming that the exciting electron beams travel along overdense fibers or by radio propagation effects that may cause a source to appear at a larger height than the true emission site. We review the arguments for both scenarios in light of recent results. We compare the extent of the quiescent corona to model predictions to estimate the impact of propagation effects, which we conclude can only partially explain the apparent density enhancements. Finally, we use the time- and frequency-varying source positions to estimate electron beam speeds of between 0.24 and 0.60 c.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.04989

Diagnostic Analysis of the Solar Proton Flares of September 2017 by Their Radio Bursts

I.M. Chertok

The powerful flares that occurred in the Sun on September 4-10, 2017 are analyzed on the basis of the technique for the quantitative diagnostics of proton flares developed in IZMIRAN in 1970-1980s. It is shown that the fluxes and energy spectra of protons with energy of tens of MeV coming to Earth qualitatively and quantitatively correspond to the intensity and frequency spectra of microwave radio bursts in the range 2.7-15.4 GHz. In particular, the flare of 4 Sept. with a peak radio flux S ~ 2000 sfu at the frequency f ~ 3 GHz (i.e., with a soft radio spectrum) was accompanied by a significant proton flux J (> 10 MeV) ~ 100 pfu and soft energy spectrum with the exponent gamma ~ 3.0, and the powerful flare of 10 Sept. with S ~ 21000 sfu at f ~ 15 GHz (i.e., with a hard radio spectrum) led to a very intense proton event with J (> 10 MeV) ~ 1000 pfu with a hard energy spectrum (gamma ~ 1.4), including a ground level enhancement (GLE72). This is further evidence that data on microwave radio bursts can be successfully used to diagnose proton flares, regardless of the particular source of acceleration of particles on the Sun.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.05021

Hypothesis about semi-weak interaction and experiments with solar neutrinos. II. Deuteron disintegration by neutral currents

L.M. Slad

The present work provides one more evidence of that the solar neutrino problem has an elegant solution based on the hypothesis about the existence of a new, semi-weak, interaction. The analysis of the deuteron disintegration by neutral currents of solar neutrinos, generated by both the electroweak and semi-weak interactions, is fulfilled. A good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results for this process is obtained, which is in harmony with the conclusions of the first part of the work on the other four observed processes with solar neutrinos.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.05103

Hypothesis about semi-weak interaction and experiments with solar neutrinos

L.M. Slad

A new concept is proposed to solve the solar neutrino problem, that is based on a hypothesis about the existence of semi-weak interaction of electron neutrinos with nucleons mediated by massless pseudoscalar bosons. Owing to about 10 collisions of a solar neutrino with nucleons of the Sun, the fluxes of left- and right-handed solar neutrinos at the Earth surface are approximately equal, and their spectrum is changed in comparison with the one at the production moment. The postulated model with one free parameter provides a good agreement between the calculated and experimental characteristics of the processes with solar neutrinos: ${}^{37}{\rm Cl} \rightarrow {}^{37}{\rm Ar}$, ${}^{71}{\rm Ga} \rightarrow {}^{71}{\rm Ge}$, $\nu_{e} e^{-}\rightarrow \nu_{e} e^{-}$, and $\nu_{e}D \rightarrow e^{-}pp$.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1502.03262

Eruptions from quiet Sun coronal bright points. I. Observations

Chauzhou Mou, Maria S. Madjarska, Klaus Galsgaard, Lidong Xia

Observations of the full lifetime of CBPs in data taken with the AIA on board SDO in four passbands, He II 304 A, Fe IX/X 171 A, Fe XII 193 A, and Fe XVIII 94 A are investigated for the occurrence of plasma ejections, micro-flaring, mini-filament eruptions and mini coronal mass ejections (mini-CMEs). First and foremost, our study shows that the majority (76%) of quiet Sun CBPs (31 out of 42 CBPs) produce at least one eruption during their lifetime. From 21 eruptions in 11 CBPs, 18 occur in average ~17 hrs after the CBP formation for an average lifetime of the CBPs in AIA 193 A of ~21 hrs. This time delay in the eruption occurrence coincides in each BP with the convergence and cancellation phase of the CBP bipole evolution during which the CBPs become smaller until they fully disappear. The remaining three happen 4 – 6 hrs after the CBP formation. In sixteen out of 21 eruptions the magnetic convergence and cancellation involve the CBP main bipoles, while in three eruptions one of the BP magnetic fragments and a pre-existing fragment of opposite polarity converge and cancel. In one BP with two eruptions cancellation was not observed. The CBP eruptions involve in most cases the expulsion of chromospheric material either as elongated filamentary structure (mini-filament, MF) or a volume of cool material (cool plasma cloud, CPC), together with the CBP or higher overlying hot loops. Coronal waves were identified during three eruptions. A micro-flaring is observed beneath all erupting MFs/CPCs. It remains uncertain whether the destabilised MF causes the micro-flaring or the destabilisation and eruption of the MF is triggered by reconnection beneath the filament. In most eruptions, the cool erupting plasma obscures partially or fully the micro-flare until the erupting material moves away from the CBP. From 21 eruptions 11 are found to produce mini-CMEs.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.04541

A Survey of Changes in Magnetic Helicity Flux on the Photosphere During Relatively Low Class Flares

Yi Bi, Ying D Liu, Yanxiao Liu, Jiayan Yang, Zhe Xu, Kaifan JI

Using the 135-second cadence of the photospheric vector data provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager telescope on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, we examined the time-evolution of magnetic helicity fluxes across the photosphere during 16 flares with the energy class lower than M5.0. During the flare in 4 out of 16 events, we found impulsive changes in the helicity fluxes. This indicates that even the flare with less energy could be associated with anomalistic transportation of the magnetic helicity across the photosphere. Accompanying the impulsive helicity fluxes, the poynting fluxes across the photosphere evolved from positive to negative. As such, the transportations of magnetic energy across the photosphere were toward solar interior during these flares. In each of the 4 events, the impulsive change in the helicity flux was always mainly contributed by abrupt change in horizontal velocity field on a sunspot located near the flaring polarity inversion line. The velocity field on each sunspot shows either an obvious vortex patten or an shearing patten relative to the another magnetic polarity, which tended to relax the magnetic twist or shear in the corona. During these flares, abrupt change in the Lorentz force acting on these sunspots were found. The rotational motions and shearing motions of these sunspots always had the same directions with the resultant Lorentz forces. These results support the view that the impulsive helicity transportation during the flare could be driven by the change in the Lorentz force applied on the photosphere.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1808.04591