Density Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Driven by Alfv\’en Wave Parametric Decay

Trevor A. Bowen, Samuel Badman, Petr Hellinger, Stuart D. Bale

Measurements and simulations of inertial compressive turbulence in the solar wind are characterized by anti-correlated magnetic fluctuations parallel to the mean field and density structures. This signature has been interpreted as observational evidence for non-propagating pressure balanced structures (PBS), kinetic ion acoustic waves, as well as the MHD slow-mode. Given the high damping rates of parallel propagating compressive fluctuations, their ubiquity in satellite observations is surprising, and suggestive of a local driving process. One possible candidate for the generation of compressive fluctuations in the solar wind is Alfv\’en wave parametric instability. Here we test the parametric decay process as a source of compressive waves in the solar wind by comparing the collisionless damping rates of compressive fluctuations with the growth rates of the parametric decay instability daughter waves. Our results suggest that generation of compressive waves through parametric decay is overdamped at 1 AU, but that the presence of slow-mode like density fluctuations is correlated with the parametric decay of Alfv\’en waves.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09336

Parametric Instability, Inverse Cascade, and the $1/f$ Range of Solar-Wind Turbulence

Benjamin D. G. Chandran

In this paper, weak turbulence theory is used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instability in 3D low-$\beta$ plasmas at wavelengths much greater than the ion inertial length under the assumption that slow magnetosonic waves are strongly damped. It is shown analytically that the parametric instability leads to an inverse cascade of Alfv\’en wave quanta, and several exact solutions to the wave kinetic equations are presented. The main results of the paper concern the parametric decay of Alfv\’en waves that initially satisfy $e^+ \gg e^-$, where $e^+$ and $e^-$ are the frequency ($\,f$) spectra of Alfv\’en waves propagating in opposite directions along the magnetic field lines. If $e^+$ initially has a peak frequency $f_0$ (at which $f e^+$ is maximized) and an "infrared" scaling $f^p$ at smaller $f$ with $-1 < p < 1$, then $e^+$ acquires an $f^{-1}$ scaling throughout a range of frequencies that spreads out in both directions from $f_0$. At the same time, $e^-$ acquires an $f^{-2}$ scaling within this same frequency range. If the plasma parameters and infrared $e^+$ spectrum are chosen to match conditions in the fast solar wind at a heliocentric distance of 0.3 astronomical units (AU), then the nonlinear evolution of the parametric instability leads to an $e^+$ spectrum that matches fast-wind measurements from the Helios spacecraft at 0.3 AU, including the observed $f^{-1}$ scaling at $f \gtrsim 3 \times 10^{-4} \mbox{ Hz}$. The results of this paper suggest that the $f^{-1}$ spectrum seen by Helios in the fast solar wind at $f \gtrsim 3\times 10^{-4} \mbox{ Hz}$ is produced in situ by parametric decay and that the $f^{-1}$ range of $e^+$ extends over an increasingly narrow range of frequencies as $r$ decreases below 0.3 AU. This prediction will be tested by measurements from the Parker Solar Probe.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09357

On the statistical properties of turbulent energy transfer rate in the inner Heliosphere

Luca Sorriso-Valvo, Francesco Carbone, Silvia Perri, Antonella Greco, Raffaele Marino, Roberto Bruno

The transfer of energy from large to small scales in solar wind turbulence is an important ingredient of the longstanding question about the mechanism of the interplanetary plasma heating. Previous studies have shown that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is statistically compatible with the observed solar wind heating as it expands in the heliosphere. However, in order to understand which processes contribute to the plasma heating, it is necessary to have a local description of the energy flux across scales. To this aim, it is customary to use indicators such as the magnetic field partial variance of increments (PVI), which is associated with the local, relative, scale-dependent magnetic energy. A more complete evaluation of the energy transfer should also include other terms, related to velocity and cross-helicity. This is achieved here by introducing a proxy for the local, scale dependent turbulent energy transfer rate epsilon_Dt(t), based on the third-order moment scaling law for MHD turbulence. Data from Helios 2 are used to determine the statistical properties of such a proxy in comparison with the magnetic and velocity fields PVI, and the correlation with local solar wind heating is computed. PVI and epsilon_Dt(t) are generally well correlated, however epsilon_Dt(t) is a very sensitive proxy that can exhibit large amplitude values, both positive and negative, even for low amplitude peaks in the PVI. Furthermore, epsilon_Dt(t) is very well correlated with local increases of temperature when large amplitude bursts of energy transfer are localized, thus suggesting an important role played by this proxy in the study of plasma energy dissipation.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09825

Super-strong Magnetic Field in Sunspots

Takenori J. Okamoto, Takashi Sakurai

Sunspots are the most notable structure on the solar surface with strong magnetic fields. The field is generally strongest in a dark area (umbra), but sometimes stronger fields are found in non-dark regions such as a penumbra and a light bridge. The formation mechanism of such strong fields outside umbrae is still puzzling. Here we report clear evidence of the magnetic field of 6,250 G, which is the strongest field among Stokes I profiles with clear Zeeman splitting ever observed on the Sun. The field was almost parallel to the solar surface and located in a bright region sandwiched by two opposite-polarity umbrae. Using a time series of spectral datasets, we discussed the formation process of the super-strong field and suggested that this strong field region was generated as a result of compression of one umbra pushed by the horizontal flow from the other umbra, like the subduction of the Earth’s crust in plate tectonics.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.08700

A quasi-periodic fast-propagating magnetosonic wave associated with the eruption of a magnetic flux rope

Yuandeng Shen, Yu Liu, Tengfei Song, Zhanjun Tian

Using high temporal and high spatial resolution observations taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the detailed observational analysis of a high quality quasi-periodic fast- propagating (QFP) magnetosonic wave that was associated with the eruption of a magnetic flux rope and a GOES C5.0 flare. For the first time, we find that the QFP wave lasted during the entire flare lifetime rather than only the rising phase of the accompanying flare as reported in previous studies. In addition, the propagation of the different parts of the wave train showed different kinematics and morphologies. For the southern (northern) part, the speed, duration, intensity variation are about 875 +/- 29 (1485 +/- 233) km/s, 45 (60) minutes, and 4% (2%), and the pronounced periods of them are 106 +/- 12 and 160 +/- 18 (75 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 16) seconds, respectively. It is interesting that the northern part of the wave train showed obvious refraction effect when they pass through a region of strong magnetic field. Periodicity analysis result indicates that all the periods of the QFP wave can be found in the period spectrum of the accompanying flare, suggesting their common physical origin. We propose that the quasi-periodic nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics process in the magnetic reconnection that produces the accompanying flare should be important for exciting of QFP wave, and the different magnetic distribution along different paths can account for the different speeds and morphology evolution of the wave fronts.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09045

Coronal magnetic field value radial distributions obtained by using the information on fast halo coronal mass ejections

V.G.Fainshtein, Ya.I.Egorov

Based on the method of finding coronal magnetic field value radial profiles B(R) described in (Gopalswamy and Yashiro, 2011), and applied for the directions close to the sky plane, we determined magnetic field value radial distributions along the directions close to the Sun-Earth axis. For this purpose, by using the method in (Xue, Wang, and Dou, 2005), from the SOHO/LASCO data, we found 3D characteristics for fast halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) and for the HCME-related shocks. Through these data, we managed to obtain the B(R) distributions as far as 43 solar radii from the Sun center, which is approximately by a factor of 2 farther, than those in (Gopalswamy and Yashiro, 2011). We drew a conclusion that, to improve the accuracy of the Gopalswamy-Yashiro method to find the coronal magnetic field, one should develop a technique to detect the CME sites that move in the slow and in the fast solar wind. We propose a technique to select the CMEs, whose central (paraxial) part moves, indeed, in the slow wind.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09046

Origin of a CME-related shock within the LASCO C3 field-of-view

V.G.Fainshtein, Ya.I.Egorov

We study the origin of a CME-related shock within the LASCO C3 field-of-view (FOV). A shock originates, when a CME body velocity on its axis surpasses the total velocity $V_A + V_{SW}$, where $V_A$ is the Alfv\’en velocity, $V_{SW}$ is the slow solar wind velocity. The formed shock appears collisionless, because its front width is manifold less, than the free path of coronal plasma charged particles. The Alfv\’en velocity dependence on the distance was found by using characteristic values of the magnetic induction radial component and of the proton concentration in the Earth orbit, and by using the known regularities of the variations in these solar wind characteristics with distance. A peculiarity of the analyzed CME is its formation at a relatively large height, and the CME body slow acceleration with distance. We arrived at a conclusion that the formed shock is a bow one relative to the CME body moving at a super Alfv\’en velocity. At the same time, the shock formation involves a steeping of the front edge of the coronal plasma disturbed region ahead of the CME body, which is characteristic of a piston shock.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1712.09051