Spectroscopic Observations of a Current Sheet in a Solar Flare

Y. Li, J. C. Xue, M. D. Ding, X. Cheng, Y. Su, L. Feng, J. Hong, H. Li, W. Q. Gan

Current sheet is believed to be the region of energy dissipation via magnetic reconnection in solar flares. However, its properties, for example, the dynamic process, have not been fully understood. Here we report a current sheet in a solar flare (SOL2017-09-10T16:06) that was clearly observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory as well as the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. The high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations show that the current sheet is mainly visible in high temperature (>10 MK) passbands, particularly in the Fe XXIV 192.03 line with a formation temperature of ~18 MK. The hot Fe XXIV 192.03 line exhibits very large nonthermal velocities up to 200 km/s in the current sheet, suggesting that turbulent motions exist there. The largest turbulent velocity occurs at the edge of the current sheet, with some offset with the strongest line intensity. At the central part of the current sheet, the turbulent velocity is negatively correlated with the line intensity. From the line emission and turbulent features we obtain a thickness in the range of 7–11 Mm for the current sheet. These results suggest that the current sheet has internal fine and dynamic structures that may help the magnetic reconnection within it proceeds efficiently.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03631

High-resolution imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy of penumbral decay

M. Verma, C. Denker, H. Balthasar, C. Kuckein, R. Rezaei, M. Sobotka, N. Deng, H. Wang, A. Tritschler, M. Collados, A. Diercke, S.J. González Manrique

Combining high-resolution spectropolarimetric and imaging data is key to understanding the decay process of sunspots as it allows us scrutinizing the velocity and magnetic fields of sunspots and their surroundings. Active region NOAA 12597 was observed on 24/09/2016 with the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope using high-spatial resolution imaging as well as imaging spectroscopy and near-infrared (NIR) spectropolarimetry. Horizontal proper motions were estimated with LCT, whereas LOS velocities were computed with spectral line fitting methods. The magnetic field properties were inferred with the SIR code for the Si I and Ca I NIR lines. At the time of the GREGOR observations, the leading sunspot had two light-bridges indicating the onset of its decay. One of the light-bridges disappeared, and an elongated, dark umbral core at its edge appeared in a decaying penumbral sector facing the newly emerging flux. The flow and magnetic field properties of this penumbral sector exhibited weak Evershed flow, moat flow, and horizontal magnetic field. The penumbral gap adjacent to the elongated umbral core and the penumbra in that penumbral sector displayed LOS velocities similar to granulation. The separating polarities of a new flux system interacted with the leading and central part of the already established active region. As a consequence, the leading spot rotated 55-degree in clockwise direction over 12 hours. In the high-resolution observations of a decaying sunspot, the penumbral filaments facing flux emergence site contained a darkened area resembling an umbral core filled with umbral dots. This umbral core had velocity and magnetic field properties similar to the sunspot umbra. This implies that the horizontal magnetic fields in the decaying penumbra became vertical as observed in flare-induced rapid penumbral decay, but on a very different time-scale.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03686

Occurrence and persistence of magnetic elements in the quiet Sun

F. Giannattasio, F. Berrilli, G. Consolini, D. Del Moro, M. Gosic, L. Bellot Rubio

Turbulent convection efficiently transports energy up to the solar photosphere, but its multi-scale nature and dynamic properties are still not fully understood. Several works in the literature have investigated the emergence of patterns of convective and magnetic nature in the quiet Sun at spatial and temporal scales from granular to global. Aims. To shed light on the scales of organisation at which turbulent convection operates, and its relationship with the magnetic flux therein, we studied characteristic spatial and temporal scales of magnetic features in the quiet Sun. Methods. Thanks to an unprecedented data set entirely enclosing a supergranule, occurrence and persistence analysis of magnetogram time series were used to detect spatial and long-lived temporal correlations in the quiet Sun and to investigate their nature. Results. A relation between occurrence and persistence representative for the quiet Sun was found. In particular, highly recurrent and persistent patterns were detected especially in the boundary of the supergranular cell. These are due to moving magnetic elements undergoing motion that behaves like a random walk together with longer decorrelations ($\sim2$ h) with respect to regions inside the supergranule. In the vertices of the supegranular cell the maximum observed occurrence is not associated with the maximum persistence, suggesting that there are different dynamic regimes affecting the magnetic elements.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1801.03871