On-Orbit Performance of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory

J. Todd Hoeksema, Charles S. Baldner, Rock I. Bush, Jesper Schou, Philip H. Scherrer

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument is a major component of NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. Since beginning normal science operations on 1 May 2010, HMI has operated with remarkable continuity, e.g. during the more than five years of the SDO prime mission that ended 30 September 2015, HMI collected 98.4% of all possible 45-second velocity maps; minimizing gaps in these full-disk Dopplergrams is crucial for helioseismology. HMI velocity, intensity, and magnetic-field measurements are used in numerous investigations, so understanding the quality of the data is important. We describe the calibration measurements used to track HMI performance and detail trends in important instrument parameters during the mission. Regular calibration sequences provide information used to improve and update the HMI data calibration. The set-point temperature of the instrument front window and optical bench is adjusted regularly to maintain instrument focus, and changes in the temperature-control scheme have been made to improve stability in the observable quantities. The exposure time has been changed to compensate for a 15% decrease in instrument throughput. Measurements of the performance of the shutter and tuning mechanisms show that they are aging as expected and continue to perform according to specification. Parameters of the tunable-optical-filter elements are regularly adjusted to account for drifts in the central wavelength. Frequent measurements of changing CCD-camera characteristics, such as gain and flat field, are used to calibrate the observations. Infrequent expected events, such as eclipses, transits, and spacecraft off-points, interrupt regular instrument operations and provide the opportunity to perform additional calibration. Onboard instrument anomalies are rare and seem to occur quite uniformly in time. The instrument continues to perform very well.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.01731

Flux Rope Breaking and Formation of a Rotating Blowout Jet

Navin Chandra Joshi, Naoto Nishizuka, Boris Filippov, Tetsuya Magara, Andrey G. Tlatov

We analyzed a small flux rope eruption converted into a helical blowout jet in a fan-spine configuration using multi-wavelength observations taken by SDO, which occurred near the limb on 2016 January 9. In our study, first, we estimated the fan-spine magnetic configuration with the potential field calculation and found a sinistral small filament inside it. The filament along with the flux rope erupted upward and interacted with the surrounding fan- spine magnetic configuration, where the flux rope breaks in the middle section. We observed compact brightening, flare ribbons and post-flare loops underneath the erupting filament. The northern section of the flux rope reconnected with the surrounding positive polarity, while the southern section straightened. Next, we observed the untwisting motion of the southern leg, which was transformed into a rotating helical blowout jet. The sign of the helicity of the mini-filament matches the one of the rotating jet. This is consistent with the jet models presented by Adams et al. (2014) and Sterling et al. (2015). We focused on the fine thread structure of the rotating jet and traced three blobs with the speed of 60-120 km/s, while the radial speed of the jet is approx 400 km/s. The untwisting motion of the jet accelerated plasma upward along the collimated outer spine field lines, and it finally evolved into a narrow coronal mass ejection at the height of approx 9 Rsun . On the basis of the detailed analysis, we discussed clear evidence of the scenario of the breaking of the flux rope and the formation of the helical blowout jet in the fan-spine magnetic configuration.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.01798

The Coronal Monsoon: Thermal Nonequilibrium Revealed by Periodic Coronal Rain

F. Auchère, C. froment, E. Soubrié, P. Antolin, R. Oliver, G. Pelouze

We report on the discovery of periodic coronal rain in an off-limb sequence of {\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images. The showers are co-spatial and in phase with periodic (6.6~hr) intensity pulsations of coronal loops of the sort described by Auchere et al. (2014) and Froment et al. (2015, 2017). These new observations make possible a unified description of both phenomena. Coronal rain and periodic intensity pulsations of loops are two manifestations of the same physical process: evaporation / condensation cycles resulting from a state of thermal nonequilibrium (TNE). The fluctuations around coronal temperatures produce the intensity pulsations of loops, and rain falls along their legs if thermal runaway cools the periodic condensations down and below transition-region (TR) temperatures. This scenario is in line with the predictions of numerical models of quasi-steadily and footpoint heated loops. The presence of coronal rain — albeit non-periodic — in several other structures within the studied field of view implies that this type of heating is at play on a large scale.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.01852