Intermittency spectra of current helicity in solar active regions

A. S. Kutsenko, V. I. Abramenko, K. M. Kuzanyan, Haiqing Xu, Hongqi Zhang

We intend to analyse the intermittency spectra of current helicity in solar active regions. We made a pixel-by-pixel comparison of current helicity maps derived from three different instruments, namely by Helioseismic and Magnetc Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI), Spectro-Polarimeter on board the Hinode, and Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station, China (HSOS/SMFT). The comparison showed an excellent correlation between the maps derived from the spaceborne instruments and moderate correlation between the maps derived from SDO/HMI and HSOS/SMFT vector magnetograms. The results suggest that the obtained maps characterize real spatial distribution of current helicity over an active region. To analyse the multifractality and intermittency of current helicity, we traditionally use the high-order structure function and flatness function approach. The slope of a flatness function within some range of scales – the flatness exponent – is a measure of the degree of intermittency. We used SDO/HMI vector magnetograms to calculate the flatness exponent variations of current helicity of three active regions: NOAA 11158, 12494, and 12673. The flatness exponents were determined within the scale range of 2-10 Mm. All three regions exhibited emergence of a new magnetic flux during the observational interval. Interestingly, the flatness exponent increased rapidly 12-20 hours before the emergence of a new flux and restored its previous value by the beginning of the emergence. We suppose that this behaviour can be explained by subphotospheric fragmentation or distortion of the existed current system by emerging magnetic flux. During the imperturbable development of active region, the flatness exponent of current helicity remains relatively low and the intermittency range shifts toward higher values up to 20-40 Mm.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.02323

Latitudinal structure and dynamic of the photospheric magnetic field

E. A. Gavryuseva (Institute for Nuclear Research RAS)

Analysis of the structure and dynamics of the magnetic field of the Sun is fundamental for understanding of the origin of solar activity and variability as well as for the study of solar-terrestrial relations. Observations of the large scale magnetic field in the photosphere taken at the Wilcox Solar Observatory from 1976 up to 2007 have been analysed to deduce its latitudinal and longitudinal structures, its differential rotation, and their variability in time. This paper is dedicated to the analysis and dynamics of the latitudinal structure of the solar magnetic field over three solar cycles 21, 22, 23. The main results discussed in this paper are the following: the large scale latitudinal structure is antisymmetric and composed of four zones with boundaries located at the equator, -25 and + 25 degrees, stable over 10-11 years with a time delay of about 5-6 years in near-equatorial zones. The variability and North-South asymmetry of polarity waves running from the equator to the poles with 2-3 – year period was studied in detail.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.02450

Rotation of the photospheric magnetic field through solar cycles 21, 22, 23

E. A. Gavryuseva (Institute for Nuclear Research RAS)

Rotation of the large scale solar magnetic field has a great importance for the understanding of solar dynamic, for the search of longitidinal structure and for the study of solar-terrestrial relations. 30-year long observations taken at the Wilcox Solar Observatory (USA) in 21-23 cycles have been analysed carefully to deduce magnetic field rotation rate at different latitudes in both hemispheres and its variability in time. The WSO data appear to indicate that additionally to the differential rotation along the latitudes there are running waves of fast rotation of the magnetic field. These torsional waves are running from the poles to the equator with a period of 11 years. The rotation of the magnetic field (RMF) is almost rigid at latitudes above 55 degrees in both hemispheres. The rotation rate in the sub-polar regions is slower when the magnetic field is strong there (during minima of solar activity), and faster when the magnetic field changes polarity (during maxima of solar activity).

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1802.02461