Photospheric observations of surface and body modes in solar magnetic pores

Peter H. Keys, Richard J. Morton, David B. Jess, Gary Verth, Samuel D. T. Grant, Mihalis Mathioudakis, Duncan H. Mackay, John G. Doyle, Damian J. Christian, Francis P. Keenan, Robertus Erdelyi

Over the past number of years, great strides have been made in identifying the various low-order magnetohydrodynamic wave modes observable in a number of magnetic structures found within the solar atmosphere. However, one aspect of these modes that has remained elusive, until now, is their designation as either surface or body modes. This property has significant implications on how these modes transfer energy from the waveguide to the surrounding plasma. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we present conclusive, direct evidence of these wave characteristics in numerous pores which were observed to support sausage modes. As well as outlining methods to detect these modes in observations, we make estimates of the energies associated with each mode. We find surface modes more frequently in the data, and also that surface modes appear to carry more energy than those displaying signatures of body modes. We find frequencies in the range of ~2 to 12 mHz with body modes as high as 11 mHz, but we do not find surface modes above 10 mHz. It is expected that the techniques we have applied will help researchers search for surface and body signatures in other modes and in differing structures to those presented here.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1803.01859

Developments of Multi-wavelength Spectro-Polarimeter on the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida Observatory

Tetsu Anan, Yu Wei Huang, Yoshikazu Nakatani, Kiyoshi Ichimoto, Satoru Ueno, Goichi Kimura, Shota Ninomiya, Sanetaka Okada, Naoki Kaneda

To obtain full Stokes spectra in multi-wavelength windows simultaneously, we developed a new spectro-polarimeter on the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida Observatory. The new polarimeter consists of a 60 cm aperture vacuum telescope on an altazimuth mount, an image rotator, a high dispersion spectrograph, polarization modulator and analyzer composed of a continuously rotating waveplate with a retardation nearly constant around 127$^{circ}$ in 500 – 1100 nm and a polarizing beam splitter located closely behind the focus of the telescope, fast and large format CMOS cameras and an infrared camera. The slit spectrograph allows us to obtain spectra in as many wavelength windows as the number of cameras. We characterized the instrumental polarization of the entire system and established the polarization calibration procedure. The cross-talks among the Stokes Q,U and V are evaluated to be about 0.06% $sim$ 1.2% depending on the degree of the intrinsic polarizations. In a typical observing setup, a sensitivity of 0.03% can be achieved in 20 – 60 second for 500 nm – 1100 nm. The new polarimeter is expected to provide a powerful tool to diagnose the 3D magnetic field and other vector physical quantities in the solar atmosphere.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1803.02094