Physical processes involved in the EUV “Surge” Event of 09 May 2012

Marcelo López Fuentes, Cristina H. Mandrini, Mariano Poisson, Pascal Démoulin, Germán Cristiani, Fernando M. López, Maria Luisa Luoni

We study an EUV confined ejection observed on 09 May 2012 in active region (AR) NOAA 11476. For the analysis we use observations in multiple wavelengths (EUV, X-rays, H$\alpha$, and magnetograms) from a variety of ground-based and space instruments. The magnetic configuration showed the presence of two rotating bipoles, with decreasing magnetic flux, within the following polarity of the AR. This evolution was present along some tens of hours before the studied event and continued even later. A minifilament with a length of $\approx 30 \arcsec$ lay along the photospheric inversion line of the largest bipole. The minifilament was observed to erupt accompanied by an M4.7 flare (SOL20120509T12:23:00). Consequently, dense material, as well as twist, was injected along closed loops in the form of a very broad ejection whose morphology resembles that of typical H$\alpha$ surges. We conclude that the flare and eruption can be explained as due to two reconnection processes, one occurring below the erupting minifilament and another one above it. This second process injects the minifilament plasma within the reconnected closed loops linking the main AR polarities. Analyzing the magnetic topology using a force-free model of the coronal field, we identify the location of quasi-separatix layers (QSLs), where reconnection is prone to occur, and present a detailed interpretation of the chromospheric and coronal eruption observations. In particular, this event, contrary to what has been proposed in several models explaining surges and/or jets, is not originated by magnetic flux emergence but by magnetic flux cancellation accompanied by the rotation of the bipoles. In fact, the conjunction of these two processes, flux cancellation and bipole rotations, is at the origin of a series of events, homologous to the one we analyze in this article, that occurred in AR 11476 from 08 to 10 May 2012.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12403

Flare Productivity of Major Flaring Solar Active Regions: A Time-series Study of Photospheric Magnetic Properties

Eo-Jin Lee, Sung-Hong Park, Yong-Jae Moon

A solar active region (AR) that produces at least one M- or X-class major flare tends to produce multiple flares during its passage across the solar disk. It will be interesting if we can estimate how flare-productive a given major flaring AR is for a time interval of several days, by investigating time series of its photospheric magnetic field properties. For this, we studied 93 major flaring ARs observed from 2010 to 2016 by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). More specifically, for each AR under study, the mean and fluctuation were calculated from an 8-day time series of each of 18 photospheric magnetic parameters extracted from the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patch (SHARP) vector magnetogram products at 12-min cadence. We then compared these with the AR’s 8-day flare index, which is defined as the sum of soft X-ray peak fluxes of flares produced in the AR during the same interval of the 8-day SHARP parameter time series. As a result, it is found that the 8-day flare index is well correlated with the mean and/or fluctuation values of some magnetic parameters (with correlation coefficients of 0.6-0.7 in log-log space). Interestingly, the 8-day flare index shows a slightly better correlation with the fluctuation than the mean for the SHARP parameters associated with the surface integral of photospheric magnetic free energy density. We also discuss how the correlation varies if the 8-day flare index is compared with the mean or fluctuation calculated from an initial portion of the SHARP parameter time series.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12505

Propagating Spectropolarimetric Disturbances in a Large Sunspot

M. Stangalini, S. Jafarzadeh, I. Ermolli, R. Erdélyi, D. B. Jess, P. H. Keys, F. Giorgi, M. Murabito, F. Berrilli, D. Del Moro

We present results derived from the analysis of spectropolarimetric measurements of active region AR12546, which represents one of the largest sunspots to have emerged onto the solar surface over the last $20$ years. The region was observed with full-Stokes scans of the Fe I 617.3 nm and Ca II 854.2 nm lines with the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope over an uncommon, extremely long time interval exceeding three hours. Clear circular polarization (CP) oscillations localized at the umbra-penumbra boundary of the observed region were detected. Furthermore, the multi-height data allowed us to detect the downward propagation of both CP and intensity disturbances at $2.5-3$~mHz, which was identified by a phase delay between these two quantities. These results are interpreted as a propagating magneto-hydrodynamic surface mode in the observed sunspot.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.12595