On the error analyses of polarization measurements of the white-light coronagraph aboard ASO-S

Li Feng, Hui Li, Bernd Inhester, Bo Chen, Beili Ying, Lei Lu, Weiqun Gan

The Advanced Space-based Solar Observatory (ASO-S) mission aims to explore two most spectacular eruptions in the Sun: solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and their magnetism. For the studies of CMEs, the payload Lyman-alpha Solar Telescope (LST) has been proposed. It includes a traditional white-light coronagraph and a Lyman-alpha coronagraph which opens a new window to CME observations. Polarization measurements taken by white-light coronagraphs are crucial to derive fundamental physical parameters of CMEs. To make such measurements, there are two options of Stokes polarimeter which have been used by existing white-light coronagraphs for space missions. One uses a single or triple linear polarizers, the other involves both a half-wave plate and a linear polarizer. We find that the former option subjects to less uncertainty in the derived Stokes vector propagated from detector noise. The latter option involves two plates which are prone to internal reflections and may have a reduced transmission factor. Therefore, the former option is adopted as our Stokes polarimeter scheme for LST. Based on the parameters of the intended linear polarizer(s) colorPol provided by CODIXX and the half-wave plate 2-APW-L2-012C by Altechna, it is further shown that the imperfect maximum transmittance of the polarizer significantly increases the variance amplification of Stokes vector by at least about 50% when compared with the ideal case. The relative errors of Stokes vector caused by the imperfection of colorPol polarizer and the uncertainty due to the polarizer assembling in the telescope are estimated to be about 5%. Among the considered parameters, we find that the dominant error comes from the uncertainty in the maximum transmittance of the polarizer.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13003

Roles of photospheric motions and flux emergence in the major solar eruption on 2017 September 6

Rui Wang, Ying D. Liu, J. Todd Hoeksema, I.V. Zimovets, Yang Liu

We study the magnetic field evolution in the active region (AR) 12673 that produced the largest solar flare in the past decade on 2017 September 6. Fast flux emergence is one of the most prominent features of this AR. We calculate the magnetic helicity from photospheric tangential flows that shear and braid field lines (shear-helicity), and from normal flows that advect twisted magnetic flux into the corona (emergence-helicity), respectively. Our results show that the emergence-helicity accumulated in the corona is $-1.6\times10^{43}~Mx^2$ before the major eruption, while the shear-helicity accumulated in the corona is $-6\times10^{43}~Mx^2$, which contributes about 79\% of the total helicity. The shear-helicity flux is dominant throughout the overall investigated emergence phase. Our results imply that the emerged fields initially contain relatively low helicity. Much more helicity is built up by shearing and converging flows acting on preexisted and emerging flux. Shearing motions are getting stronger with the flux emergence, and especially on both sides of the polarity inversion line of the core field region. The evolution of the vertical currents shows that most of the intense currents do not appear initially with the emergence of the flux, which implies that most of the emerging flux is probably not strongly current-carrying. The helical magnetic fields (flux rope) in the core field region are probably formed by long-term photospheric motions. The shearing and converging motions are continuously generated driven by the flux emergence. AR 12673 is a representative as photospheric motions contribute most of the nonpotentiality in the AR with vigorous flux emergence.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13092

Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the X9.3 Flare on 2017 September 6: Evolving Magnetic Topology

Chaowei Jiang, Peng Zou, Xueshang Feng, Qiang Hu, Rui Liu, P. Vemareddy, Aiying Duan, Pingbing Zuo, Yi Wang, Fengsi Wei

Three-dimensional magnetic topology is crucial to understanding the explosive release of magnetic energy in the corona during solar flares. Much attention has been given to the pre-flare magnetic topology to identify candidate sites of magnetic reconnection, yet it is unclear how the magnetic reconnection and its attendant topological changes shape the eruptive structure and how the topology evolves during the eruption. Here we employed a realistic, data-constrained magnetohydrodynamic simulation to study the evolving magnetic topology for an X9.3 eruptive flare that occurred on 2017 September 6. The simulation successfully reproduces the eruptive features and processes in unprecedented detail. The numerical results reveal that the pre-flare corona contains multiple twisted flux systems with different connections, and during the eruption, these twisted fluxes form a coherent flux rope through tether-cutting-like magnetic reconnection below the rope. Topological analysis shows that the rising flux rope is wrapped by a quasi-separatrix layer, which intersects itself below the rope, forming a topological structure known as hyperbolic flux tube, where a current sheet develops, triggering the reconnection. By mapping footpoints of the newly-reconnected field lines, we are able to reproduce both the spatial location and, for the first time, the temporal separation of the observed flare ribbons, as well as the dynamic boundary of the flux rope’s feet. Futhermore, the temporal profile of the total reconnection flux is comparable to the soft X-ray light curve. Such a sophisticated characterization of the evolving magnetic topology provides important insight into the eventual understanding and forecast of solar eruptions.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13095

Magnetic Configuration Associated with Two-Ribbon Solar Flares

Han He, Huaning Wang, Yihua Yan, Bo Li, P. F. Chen

Magnetic configuration of flare-bearing active regions (ARs) is one key aspect for understanding the initiation mechanism of solar flares. In this paper, we perform a comparative analysis between the magnetic configurations of two X-class two-ribbon flares happened in AR 10930 (on 2006 December 13) and AR 11158 (on 2011 February 15), whose photospheric magnetic fields were observed by Hinode and SDO satellites, respectively, and coronal magnetic fields were calculated based on nonlinear force-free field model. The analysis shows that both the flares initiated in local areas with extremely strong current density intensity, and the magnetic field chirality (indicated by sign of force-free factor {\alpha}) along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) is opposite for the two ARs, that is, left-hand ({\alpha}<0) for AR 10930 and right-hand ({\alpha}>0) for AR 11158. Our previous study (He et al. 2014) showed that, for the flare of AR 10930, a prominent magnetic connectivity was formed above the main PIL before the flare and was totally broken after the flare eruption, and the two branches of broken magnetic connectivity combined with the isolated electric current at the magnetic connectivity breaking site compose a Z-shaped configuration. In this work, we find similar result for the flare of AR 11158 except that its magnetic configuration is inverse Z-shaped, which corresponds to the right-hand chirality of AR 11158 in contrast to the left-hand chirality of AR 10930. We speculate that two-ribbon flares can be generally classified to these two magnetic configurations by chirality ({\alpha} signs) of ARs.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13124

Magnetic Configuration Associated with Two-Ribbon Solar Flares

Han He, Huaning Wang, Yihua Yan, Bo Li, P. F. Chen

Magnetic configuration of flare-bearing active regions (ARs) is one key aspect for understanding the initiation mechanism of solar flares. In this paper, we perform a comparative analysis between the magnetic configurations of two X-class two-ribbon flares happened in AR 10930 (on 2006 December 13) and AR 11158 (on 2011 February 15), whose photospheric magnetic fields were observed by Hinode and SDO satellites, respectively, and coronal magnetic fields were calculated based on nonlinear force-free field model. The analysis shows that both the flares initiated in local areas with extremely strong current density intensity, and the magnetic field chirality (indicated by sign of force-free factor {\alpha}) along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) is opposite for the two ARs, that is, left-hand ({\alpha}<0) for AR 10930 and right-hand ({\alpha}>0) for AR 11158. Our previous study (He et al. 2014) showed that, for the flare of AR 10930, a prominent magnetic connectivity was formed above the main PIL before the flare and was totally broken after the flare eruption, and the two branches of broken magnetic connectivity combined with the isolated electric current at the magnetic connectivity breaking site compose a Z-shaped configuration. In this work, we find similar result for the flare of AR 11158 except that its magnetic configuration is inverse Z-shaped, which corresponds to the right-hand chirality of AR 11158 in contrast to the left-hand chirality of AR 10930. We speculate that two-ribbon flares can be generally classified to these two magnetic configurations by chirality ({\alpha} signs) of ARs.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13124

Successive flux rope eruptions from $\delta$-Sunspots region of NOAA 12673 and associated X-class eruptive flares on 2017 September 6

Prabir K. Mitra (USO/PRL, India), Bhuwan Joshi (USO/PRL, India), Avijeet Prasad (USO/PRL, India), Astrid M. Veronig (Univ. of Graz, Austria), R. Bhattacharyya (USO/PRL, India)

In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of two X-class solar eruptive flares of classes X2.2 and X9.3 that occurred in the sigmoidal active region NOAA 12673 on 2017 September 6, by combining observations of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. On the day of the reported activity, the photospheric structure of the active region displayed a very complex network of $\delta$-sunspots that gave rise to the formation of a coronal sigmoid observed in the hot EUV channels. Both X-class flares initiated from the core of the sigmoid sequentially within an interval of $\sim$3 hours and progressed as a single "sigmoid–to–arcade" event. Differential emission measure analysis reveals strong heating of plasma at the core of the active region right from the pre-flare phase which further intensified and spatially expanded during each event. The identification of a pre-existing magnetic null by non-force-free-field modeling of the coronal magnetic fields at the location of early flare brightenings and remote faint ribbon-like structures during the pre-flare phase, which were magnetically connected with the core region, provide support for the breakout model of solar eruption. The magnetic extrapolations also reveal flux rope structures prior to both flares which are subsequently supported by the observations of the eruption of hot EUV channels. The second X-class flare diverged from the standard flare scenario in the evolution of two sets of flare ribbons, that are spatially well separated, providing firm evidence of magnetic reconnections at two coronal heights.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13146

Properties of the inner penumbral boundary and temporal evolution of a decaying sunspot

M. Benko (1), S. J. González Manrique (1), H. Balthasar (2), P. Gömöry (1), C. Kuckein (2), J. Jurčák (3) ((1) Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, (2) Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, (3) Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic)

It was empirically determined that the umbra-penumbra boundaries of stable sunspots are characterized by a constant value of the vertical magnetic field. We analyzed the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field properties of a decaying sunspot belonging to NOAA 11277 between August 28 – September 3, 2011. The observations were acquired with the spectropolarimeter on-board of the Hinode satellite. We aim to proof the validity of the constant vertical magnetic-field boundary between the umbra and penumbra in decaying sunspots. A spectral-line inversion technique was used to infer the magnetic field vector from the full-Stokes profiles. In total, eight maps were inverted and the variation of the magnetic properties in time were quantified using linear or quadratic fits. We found a linear decay of the umbral vertical magnetic field, magnetic flux, and area. The penumbra showed a linear increase of the vertical magnetic field and a sharp decay of the magnetic flux. In addition, the penumbral area quadratically decayed. The vertical component of the magnetic field is weaker on the umbra-penumbra boundary of the studied decaying sunspot compared to stable sunspots. Its value seem to be steadily decreasing during the decay phase. Moreover, at any time of the shown sunspot decay, the inner penumbra boundary does not match with a constant value of the vertical magnetic field, contrary to what was seen in stable sunspots. During the decaying phase of the studied sunspot, the umbra does not have a sufficiently strong vertical component of the magnetic field and is thus unstable and prone to be disintegrated by convection or magnetic diffusion. No constant value of the vertical magnetic field was found for the inner penumbral boundary.

Original Article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1810.13185